Anyone have a good recipe for Caldo Tlalpeno?


A reader recently posted a question underneath a blog item I wrote last year about Mexican soups. I had proclaimed myself a fan of Caldo Tlalpeno, and he wants to know if anyone has any good recipes. All I know is that the Caldo Tlalpeno includes chicken or turkey, chick peas, avocado, rice, one or two chiles – and other good stuff, but I don’t have any personal recipes since I typically buy the soup already-made in Tijuana restaurants.

If anyone has a favorite recipe can you share it with us? C’mon Food Bloggers – I bet you have some ideas. I will prominently feature your link if you share…

Here are a few I pulled from the Internet:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Caldo-Tlalpeno-13156

http://mexicofoodandmore.com/soups/tlalpeno-soup-recipe-caldo-tlalpeno.html

http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=550045

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6 responses to “Anyone have a good recipe for Caldo Tlalpeno?

  1. I declare myself a fan of caldo tlalpeño too 🙂

    At home we ofent cook caldo and reading the recipes you pulled from the Internet I can see we basically do it the same way.

    Just a few differences/tips.

    While boiling the chicken breasts we like to add two leaves of laurel and a little of epazote in to the water, it gives a special flavor to the broth.

    We do not mix the chile chipotle in to the broth, we prefer to serve it on the side so everyone can control the spiciness of his own caldo.

    Finally, we also garnish with some cilantro, avocado slices, chopped onion, squeezed lime and… pieces of oaxaca cheese which melts in the hot caldo.

    Mmm… I’m getting myself hungry.

    • Thank you for your suggestions, aixetaire. Throw in some thick, hearty corn tortillas on the side, and this meal is ready to go!

  2. The chickpeas are really from the Old World, call it fusion if you must. Here’s a recipe that’s muy autóctona.

    Caldo Tlalpeño

    Alicia Ruiz de León, Mexico City
    La Cocina Familiar en la Ciudad de México, 1988

    serves twelve

    6 chicken breasts
    1 onion, quartered
    2 cloves of garlic, smashed
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 onions, thinly sliced
    3 tomatoes, skinned and seeded
    2 dry chiles chipotles, whole
    2 xoconstles, seeded and julienned
    2 avocados, each sliced into twelfths

    Boil the chicken, the quartered onion, and the garlic in enough water to cover. Strain the liquid and reserve. Remove the skin and bones from the chicken breasts and cut the meat into halves.

    Simmer the three onions and the tomatoes in the olive oil until dry. Add the clean chicken stock, the chicken meat, the chiles, and the xoconstles: simmer for twenty minutes more. Remove the chiles.

    Serve the broth with one piece of chicken and two slices of avocado per person.

  3. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so maybe the onions are from the Mediterranean and the chicken is from southeast Asia and the garlic and olive oil are from Spain. So maybe doña Alicia isn’t alive to defend her family’s recipe.

    Nonetheless, the question remains: What makes caldo tlalpeño essentially tlalpeño?

    Y que se obstengan los chilangotes, por favor.

  4. You gotta LOVE Mexican soups. The hot and cool combo is wild.

    Hey, wanted you and your readers to know that there’s a cool new food and wine pairing contest going on.

    Match your best recipes with the wines that go best with them…

    If you like, you can learn more about the Santa Margherita Great Taste Challenge and see if you want to enter!

    Viva la soup!

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