Tag Archives: rosarito

Sand sculptures in Rosarito Beach

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Rosarito Beach  held a sand sculpture contest this weekend, and the builders were still busy at work by the time I got there around 2:30 p.m. that Sunday. Shortly afterwards, the mayor of Rosarito Beach, Hugo Tores, inspected the 30+ entries as journalists chased after him with their cameras. The winning entry for the Baja Sand contest was an octopus. Second place went to a version of the Titanic and third place went to a design with an eco-friendly message created by employees of the Baja California water agency. Here are a few of the other entries:

A face with a mohawk hair cut…

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A snowman made of sand…

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An Aztec pyramid…

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Rosarito Beach surf contest this weekend (Aug. 22-23)


Picture 3Do you know that Rosarito Beach’s Mayor Hugo Torres (right) surfs? I once saw a picture of the septuagenarian in a local Mexican newspaper, looking fit and ready to hit the waves with his surfboard.

Torres may not be competing in this weekend’s Rosarito Beach Pro-Am surf contest (Aug.22-23), but I wouldn’t be surprised to see him there promoting the sport and the city’s attributes. To learn more about the event, here are excerpts from a Rosarito Beach press release that came to me via e-mail:

 

 

ROSARITO BEACH, BAJA CALIFORNIA , MEXICO—The first Rosarito Beach Pro-Am surf contest will be held this Saturday and Sunday with $10,000 in prizes. The event is organized by the city, FDt Marketing and sponsored by Monster Energy Drink
“We have promotional parties set up for Saturday Aug 22 , and beach activities happening during the event,” said Jeff Stoner, president of FDt Marketing.
The event will be webcast live on surfshot.com.
Registration for the contest is open, and spots remain for those interested in competing. Registration is available on active.com(keyword search: Rosarito Beach ), or by contacting the FDt Marketing offices directly at 858.272.2191.
Registration fees are $100. Hotel accommodations and discounts are provided by the Rosarito Beach Hotel, and can be made by calling (866) ROSARITO.
Shuttle services will be provided to and from the US Border to the Rosarito Beach Hotel. Passports are required. For more information on the Rosarito Beach Pro-AM surf contest, please visit rosarito.org/surf or call FDt Marketing at 858.272.2191.
ROSARITO BEACH, BAJA CALIFORNIA , MEXICO—The first Rosarito Beach Pro-Am surf contest will be held this Saturday and Sunday with $10,000 in prizes. The event is organized by the city, FDt Marketing and sponsored by Monster Energy Drink.

“We have promotional parties set up for Saturday Aug 22 , and beach activities happening during the event,” said Jeff Stoner, president of FDt Marketing.

The event will be webcast live on surfshot.com.

Registration for the contest is open, and spots remain for those interested in competing. Registration is available on active.com(keyword search: Rosarito Beach ), or by contacting the FDt Marketing offices directly at 858.272.2191.

Registration fees are $100. Hotel accommodations and discounts are provided by the Rosarito Beach Hotel, and can be made by calling (866) ROSARITO.

Shuttle services will be provided to and from the US Border to the Rosarito Beach Hotel. Passports are required. For more information on the Rosarito Beach Pro-AM surf contest, please visit rosarito.org/surf or call FDt Marketing at 858.272.2191.

 

Screenshot of Rosarito Beach mayor Hugo Torres from Rosarito Beach city government page.

What to do in Tijuana-Rosarito Beach-Ensenada Aug. 14-16

Picture 2Tijuana Eventos, a Spanish-language entertainment site for things to do south of the border, notes that this Friday-Saturday-Sunday (Aug. 14-16)  will mark the first “Reggae by the Beach” festival in Rosarito Beach.

It costs about $15. Here is a link for some information in Spanish: http://tijuanaeventos.com/eventos/details/1373-1er-festival-campamento-qreggae-by-the-beachHere is the same information in English from My Baja Guide: http://www.mybajaguide.com/eng/detail-events.php?event=2212

If you are looking for a more sophisticated weekend, the Guadalupe Valley Harvest Wine Festival continues through Aug. 23. This is in Baja’s wine country,  to the east of Ensenada. Check out this story in The San Diego Union-Tribune, with up-to-date information.

Add your weekend picks for south of the border in the comments section below:

Mexican Immigration opens branch in Rosarito for U.S., other expats

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Rosarito Beach has become a popular hub for U.S. expats, many who rent or buy places along the coast. An estimated 14,000 of them live in this coastal city, about 15 minutes south of central Tijuana. Just like Mexican immigrants north of the border, not all of them have got their residency papers in order. About 8,000 expats are registered legal residents of Rosarito Beach. Rather than round up the rest of them for deportation, Mexican authorities have opened an immigration branch office to make it easier for everyone to be in compliance.

Here is the press release from Rosarito Beach’s communications office:

A branch office of Mexico ’s department of immigration has opened at Rosarito’s City Hall to better serve the area’s large and growing expatriate population. Previously, the nearest office was in Tijuana . The Rosarito office will be open Monday through Friday from 8 to 1. Phone numbers are 661-612-7262or 661-612-7263.

Through the office people can receive advice and assistance with FM3s, FM2s and other immigration matters. Appointments are available by calling the above numbers or people can simply go to the office. Immigration officials also welcome presidents of the city’s several expatriate groups to contact them for information they can share with their members.

About 8,000 expatriates in Rosarito, primarily from the United States , are registered with immigration. Rosarito Beach Mayor Hugo Torres estimates that about 6,000 are not registered.

“This office is a welcome addition to the city and will make it easier for our residents to receive needed services,” Torres said. “Already, about 10 percent of our population are expatriates and we expect that number to grow significantly in the future as more Baby Boomers retire here.”


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Get a taste of Baja in Los Angeles this weekend

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I usually get my taste of  Baja California south of the border, but this weekend  – Saturday, June 20 – the border is coming to those of us who live or work in the Los Angeles area.

Baja tourism officials are holding “El Sabor de Baja en LA,” which will feature food, music and artwork from the peninsula cities of Tijuana, Ensenada and Rosarito Beach. The event lasts from noon to 6 p.m. and it will take place at Plaza Mexico at 3100 E. Imperial Hwy, in Lynwood.

And, in case you didn’t know, some really good wine is produced in Baja that would be worth tasting.

Baja tourism officials did something like this in San Diego recently, too. I am all for promoting this event since it’s the yin to the yang of less savory subjects that make Baja such a fascinatingly complicated region. Thanks to Bill Esparza over at his blog, Street Gourmet LA, for the heads-up on this one.

San Diego Magazine revisits 2006 Rosarito beheadings

 

felixSan Diego Magazine is publishing a series of stories about drug trafficking along the border. In the first installment, S.D. Liddick explores the case of the 2006 beheadings of the Rosarito Beach police officers, which was linked to the Arellano-Felix drug organization. It’s well worth the read. Liddick spent considerable time collecting information for this story. I know because at one point when I still worked at The San Diego Union-Tribune, he lost the cell phone number for the former Rosarito police chief Valente Montijo-Pompa  – and I helped him get back in touch with the chief.

The story is skillfully written with powerful insights into the corruptible forces of drug trafficking, including some fascinating quotes by realist Montijo-Pompa, who freely admits “I’m not going to fight with somebody whose circumstances are 1,000 to my one. I’m not going to be a hero—to kill my people. I’m not going to sacrifice others or convert Rosarito into a battleground or put innocents in the middle.”

With Mexican drug trafficking violence the “hot” topic over the past year or so,  many media groups are jostling for a chance to claim their stake in this story. Of course, the story has been going on for years but the degree of attention tends to correspond to body counts. It’s no surprise that San Diego Magazine would explore this issue in depth, and kudos to the magazine for investing the time and resources in doing so. I look forward to reading the upcoming installments. My only issue with the first article is that I think it takes an unwarranted and unsubstantiated swipe at the quality of border coverage by other media groups in a curious attempt to elevate the article’s authority. You can read my opinion in the story’s online comments section.

Read the first installment of “Blood of Their Brothers: The Border Trilogy”  here.

 

Photo of car dealership in Los Angeles with no apparent link to the Arellano-Felix organization whatsoever.

Other dog rescues along the border

(photo from screen shot of Humane Society of Tijuana web page)

 

From my years of reporting experience, I’ve found that few topics elicit as much reader reaction as stories about immigration and animals.

Imagine what happens when you mix the two, which is what happened this week when news media reported a story about a shepherd mix puppy whose abuse along the U.S.-Mexico border fence was documented on video. According to an article in The San Diego Union-Tribune, a man tossed the puppy over the border fence from Tijuana into the U.S. and then proceeded to jump over the fence to beat the puppy. The incident was caught on tape, the man retreated back into Mexico and the Border Patrol rescued the animal.

The Border Patrol isn’t the only group rescuing abandoned and abused animals from Tijuana. With Mexico stretched for resources to provide social services for its own residents,  Baja California residents and U.S. expatriates have created non-governmental associations dedicated to protecting four-legged critters. Here’s the ones I’m aware of:

The Baja Animal Sanctuary is a shelter and pet adoption center in Rosarito Beach run by U.S. expatriate Sunny Benedict. The shelter, started in 1997,  typically holds 400 animals on any given day.

The Humane Society of Tijuana, which is run by a group of U.S. expats and Mexicans,  is another volunteer group that holds free sterilization and vaccination clinics to abate the street animal problem in low-income areas. They also conduct “rescue missions” of street animals. Read a story about them here.

On the other side of the Baja California peninsula, another group of U.S. expatriates has been operating a shelter in the San Felipe area and hosting spaying/neutering clinics. Learn more about The San Felipe Animal Rescue group here.