Tijuana streets getting a concrete makeover


tijuanastreetwork

Tijuana has been the brunt of many a pothole joke. It’s not entirely an exageration. After years of living and working there, I was amazed at how they seemed to appear overnight.  I once did a story on them, and was told as many as xxx existed in the city. Not even a  a mobile pothole patcher designed in xxx seemed to keep them from popping up.

 

These days, however, the signs of street progress are clearly underway as huge swaths of pothole-pocked asphalt streets are being entirely replaced with sturdy concrete. You can get a taste of this  when you enter Tijuana from the Otay Mesa port of entry where the new topping makes for a smoother and quieter entry experience.
The administration of Tijuana mayor Jorge Ramos apparently borrowed money to pay for the road work. It may be annoying to many Tijuanans who must navigate around orange construction cones and cement trucks, but I expect that new roads will leave a tangible impression on residents here, and it certainly won’t hurt the political aspirations of Ramos, who may just be interested in running for governor.
Tijuana has been the brunt of many a pothole joke. It’s not entirely an exageration. After living and working there, I was amazed at how they seemed to appear overnight.  I once did a story on them for The San Diego Union-Tribune, and was told that as many as 800,000 existed in the city. Not even a mobile pothole patcher  seemed to keep them from popping up.
These days, however, the signs of street progress are clearly underway as huge swaths of pothole-pocked asphalt streets are being entirely replaced with sturdy concrete. You can get a taste of this  when you enter Tijuana from the Otay Mesa port of entry area where the new topping makes for a smoother and quieter entry experience.
 This article in Tijuana’s Frontera newspaper says that paying the debt will take 20 years and take up 6 percent of the city’s annual budget each year. Tijuana mayor Jorge Ramos countered by saying the new roads won’t be pothole-prone, and it beats wasting lots of money each year to fix the holes.
It may be annoying to many Tijuanans who must navigate around orange construction cones and cement trucks, but I expect that a smoother driving experience here will leave a tangible impression on residents (and visitors). I wouldn’t be surprised if it also helps Ramos when Baja Californians vote for a new governor. 
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2 responses to “Tijuana streets getting a concrete makeover

  1. Ahhh…a Cemex truck. many of the rpads in Mexico are made of concrete already.

  2. Hi, Mike. I sure am enjoying these concrete streets in Tijuana – It makes for a completely different driving experience!

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