Defying a Spring Break travel warning


 

People often ask me whether Tijuana is really dangerous. Well, the U.S. Justice Department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives apparently thinks the drug violence is dangerous enough to warn university students about visiting Tijuana and Rosarito Beach during the popular Spring Break period. Some universities have also taken up the “don’t go south” mantra. I have mixed feelings about these advisories from my experience living and working in Tijuana as a reporter.  I wrote about some of the region’s most gruesome crimes – but I never got caught in the crossfire. Here is a recap of a recent, non-newsworthy Saturday evening spent in Tijuana.

 

bustour1a

I arrived at Tijuana’s main cultural center, the CECUT, at 6 p.m. to attend a presentation by Mexican scholar Marco Antonio Samaniego on his new book, “Nationalism and Revolution: The events of 1911 in Baja California.” The presentation had a late start (Mexican time frames are typically looser than ours) so I wandered outside and bought some warm cooked corn, called elote or esquite. I like mine plain, but most Mexicans prefer the works: Chile, butter, cheese, lime, salt, you name it.

elote1

Samaniego talked about the significance of the Mexican Revolution along the Baja border and how chaos basically created a volatile mix of interests that collided and intersected, and that some of this was fueled by the perceived or real threat of a U.S. invasion. More of that in a future blog posting…

samaniegoa

Afterwards, I went to the restaurant Tabule to celebrate a friend’s birthday. Tabule is located along the main entrance to the Beverly Hills of Tijuana, a neighborhood called Chapultepec. There is also a Tabule in San Diego. I munched on assorted cheese, duck tacos and a tasty mushroom appetizer. By the time we left at 11 p.m., the place was just starting to get busy (Night life starts late here).

tabule1

I think I saw some police sirens at one point during the evening – but they were way in the distance.

 

To get another glimpse of life in Tijuana during a typical weekend, check out Derrik Chinn’s blog where he recently posted an entry on what he did on a Saturday in Tijuana.

The blogger over at Tijuana Bible, Lynn DeWeese-Parkinson, recently went to a soccer game in Tijuana.

And Masa Assassin, an unidentified San Diego-based blogger, dishes about eating some birria tacos in Tijuana before heading to Ensenada this past weekend.

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8 responses to “Defying a Spring Break travel warning

  1. I’m so tired of explaining things to people who are afraid to go to Mexico. Now my response is “I choose to live life standing up not on my knees”.

    Nice write-up I love elote mmmm

  2. Karen Branch-Brioso

    Nice, Anna. Did the elote guy sell esquites, too? That was always my favorite walking-around snack in Mexico City.

  3. Yes, he did! From what I understand, after doing a little bit of research on the web, elote refers to corn on the cob. Esquites refers to the corn kernels from the cob. Both can be decked out with plenty of savory offerings.

    I should have ben more specific! I actually had plain esquites, with no toppings.

  4. US media should instead be focused exposing the gun dealers in the US making huge profits arming drug dealers.

  5. Hello!
    Very Interesting post! Thank you for such interesting resource!
    PS: Sorry for my bad english, I’v just started to learn this language 😉
    See you!
    Your, Raiul Baztepo

  6. Thanks for your greeting, Raiul!

  7. You have to express more your opinion to attract more readers, because just a video or plain text without any personal approach is not that valuable. But it is just form my point of view

    • Thanks for your thoughts, Loaseealbumma. I think that blogs can serve all kinds of purposes. Some of them can be highly opinionated and others can be more informative. I think you can make it what you want it to be, and what works best is what goes with your personality and goals.

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